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: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verify errors. a u.s. citizen in tennessee actually receive an error notice from her employer. she went to the social security administration office to fix it. she thinks she fixes it at social security, but e-verify generates another error and she gets fired. another example, a u.s. citizen experienced an error because an employer made a simple mistake when they were typing the employee's social security number into the system. again, that worker went to a social security office, couldn't resolve the error there, e-verify generated a final nonconfirmation and the worker got fired. the most disturbing piece of all this is that for workers who lose their jobs because of an e-verify error, there's no formal process in place for them to get the jobs back and that's a problem for thousands of workers who experience these errors because you can imagine, these problems are only going to grow exponentially if we mandate the program. given these concerns, we have recommendations for how to move forward. first, congress ne
points in the projected u.s. federal deficits over the remainder of this century. if mr. obama will not make his case, who will? the title of that budget -- that editorial -- "obama's budget shows failure of leadership." that is absolutely true, it was a failure of leadership. what about "the washington post" writing on a little further -- quote -- "white house budget director jacob j. lew has told advocates of reform that the white house thinks any significant plan offered by the president would simply become a target for a partisan attack." then he goes on to quote alice rivlin, saying -- quote -- "i would have preferred to see the administration get out front on addressing the entitlements and the tax reform that we need to reduce long-run deficits," said alice rivlin, a commission member on the deficit commission who served as budget director in the clinton white house. that's what alice rivlin, a wise commentator. a democrat but a wise commentator. but -- and she went on to say -- quote -- "but they clearly made a tactical decision." she meant a political decision. "the
when needed. the fiscal outlook which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year '13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the $180 billion. the combination of the continuing resolution a shortfall -- excuse me, the shortfall in oversays contingency operation funds for afghanistan and the sequester and fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17 to $18 billion shortfall to the army's operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 billion to other programs. all of this will come in remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year 2013 fiscal situation -- impact on all forces not serving in afghanistan or forward in korea. impacts which will have a significant impact to fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few of the acts we will be forced to take, are for example, we will curtail training for 80% of ground forces. this will impact our unit's basic warfighting skills and shortfall across critical specialty including aviation, intelligence, engineering, and even our ability to recruit soldiers in to our army. we have directed an immediate army hard wiring
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
in idaho but nationwide. the u.s. department of justice reported that the number of women killed by an intimate partner decreased by 35%. in 2012 it was reported that in one day alone 688 women and their children impacted by violence sought safety in an emergency shelter or received counseling, legal advocacy or children's support. while we may not agree on all the specifics of this reauthorization -- and there are portions of it that we will continue to negotiate on and to refine -- we do all agree on one very important idea, and that is that violence should not happen to anyone. and this critical legislation is very effective in helping to address that abuse in our society. as i said, there are parts of this legislation under which there still are concerns, and i am committed, as senator leahy is, to working with those who have concerns to make the bill better and more workable so that we can move it through to become law in this session of congress. but after we debate and after we work and define the legislation, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting the authorization
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7